—Selected Clips—

  Illustration: Justin Metz

Illustration: Justin Metz

POLITICO MAGAZINE (Jan. 2018)
Can Washington Be Automated? 
"This kind of data-crunching might sound hopelessly wonky, a kind of baseball-stats-geek approach to Washington. But if you’ve spent years attempting to make sense of the Washington information ecosystem—which can often feel like a swirling mass of partially baked ideas, misunderstandings and half-truths—the effect is mesmerizing."

  Photo: Darcy Padilla

Photo: Darcy Padilla

NEXT CITY (Nov. 2013) 
The Black Car Company People Love to Hate
"[T]he battle is on, all across the country, to determine whether Uber will remake the transportation market or whether the transportation market will remake Uber first. There’s no better place to understand that fight than where regulations are both business and sport: Washington, D.C."

  Illustration: Miles Donovan/POLITICO

Illustration: Miles Donovan/POLITICO

POLITICO'S THE AGENDA (Jan. 2018)
How Steve Case Became Washington's Tech Whisperer
"Everyone here—the politicians, the founders, a healthy helping of Capitol Hill staff—was in the room at the invitation (and in the founders’ case, on the dime of) someone whose name some of the younger participants could be forgiven for otherwise not knowing: America Online founder Steve Case."

  Photo: Stephen Voss

Photo: Stephen Voss

WASHINGTONIAN (Dec. 2013)
Punk Politico: Revolution Messaging’s Scott Goodstein
"'We don’t celebrate Columbus Day, because of how ruthless he was to the Arawak Indians,' Goodstein says. Instead, Revolution’s employees are off on May Day, the labor movement’s commemoration of an 1886 bombing at a workers’ rally in Chicago, known as the Haymarket Affair. 'If I get to write the rules,' he says, 'why not?'"

  Photo: John Shinkle/POLITICO

Photo: John Shinkle/POLITICO

POLITICO (March 2017)
Silicon Valley Sends its Ambassador to Appalachia
"If the goal is keeping Appalachian people in the rolling hills of Paintsville and Pikesville and Harlan County, not fleeing to places like Ypsilanti and Cincinnati, America’s tech boom might be the last best hope. 'We can't afford to be too resentful,' said [Rep. Hal Rogers]. 'We'd rather sleep here.'

THEATLANTIC.COM (Feb. 2011)
When the Internet Nearly Fractured, and How It Could Happen Again

"Kashpureff came to see that the Internet was coming increasingly under the control of a tiny "cabal" of academics, industry figures and government entities. And he wasn't going to just stand by and watch while the establishment took over."