Nancy Scola is a journalist, reporter, and writer, now at Politico, whose work focuses on illuminating those places where technology intersects with politics, policy, and civic life. For nearly a decade, her coverage of everything from how tech is changing the art of political campaigning to the ongoing policy debate over net neutrality has appeared in the Atlantic, the Washington Post, Reuters, Washingtonian, the American Prospect, Next City, and many other publications.


Nancy Scola is a journalist, reporter, and writer, now at Politico, whose work focuses on illuminating those places where technology intersects with politics, policy, and civic life.

For nearly a decade, her coverage of everything from how tech is changing the art of political campaigning to the ongoing policy debate over net neutrality has appeared in the Atlantic, the Washington Post, Reuters, Washingtonian, the American Prospect, Next City, and many other publications.

 

 

 

A SAMPLER OF work

 
 

How Medium is breaking Washington's op-ed habit

Politico: "Medium, the three-year-old online publishing platform run by one of the founders of Twitter, has spent much of its infancy assiduously courting members of the political class. The pitch is clear: Get your message out with none of the editorial interference that comes with old-school media."

Uber: The Black Car Company People Love to Hate

Next City: "Travis Kalanick, the 36-year-old CEO of the ride-on-demand company Uber, calls it the 'palm to forehead' moment: That instant when you understand for yourself why a simple car hailing app has both captured people’s imaginations and churned up a queasy feeling in the stomachs of taxi industry power players. Here’s mine."

Punk Politico

Washingtonian: "A punk sensibility has fueled [Scott] Goodstein’s career, first as a promoter in the record industry, then as a political campaigner for Barack Obama and other Democrats. Revolution Messaging is a model of punk tactics, recruiting outsiders to its causes, making a virtue of low budgets, and tempering outrage with high-minded principles."

Google Testing the Waters in Cuba

Politico: "It’s the latest sign that U.S. tech companies are testing the seriousness of Cuba’s interest in opening up to outside investment after President Barack Obama’s announcement of a historic thaw in relations and the Raúl Castro-led government’s recent pledge to bring Internet access to all Cubans by 2020."

Uber's Not a $40-Billion Start-Up. It's a Mid-Sized Car Company.

The Washington Post: "As it puts together its latest round of fundraising, Uber has been valued at $40 billion. Many have found that figure eye-popping for a six-year-old ride-on-demand company. But at least some transportation scholars say that that figure isn't so crazy."

Meet Carl Malamud, Washington's I.T. Guy

The American Prospect: "The work of freeing government information often carries the connotation of exposing secrets about nefarious policies or officials' bad behavior. Malamud, a technologist through and through, approaches it from a different angle, one that can be more palatable to the political class."

Will Apps that Don't Burn Through Your Data Plan Destroy the Internet or Save It?

The Washington Post

Congressman Darrell Issa's Call to the Internet's Right Side

The Atlantic

The Four Things Republicans in Congress Could Do to Stymie Net Neutrality

The Washington Post

White House Launches 'U.S. Digital Service,' with HealthCare.gov Fixer at the Helm

The Washington Post

How Patent Reform's Fraught Politics Have Left the U.S. Patent Office Without a Boss

The Washington Post

Ace in the Allegheny

Next City

Code for America: Beyond Code in the Tomorrow City

Next City

The Guardian Project: Building Mobile Security for a Dangerous World

techPresident

When the Internet Nearly Fractured, and How It Could Happen Again

The Atlantic