Nancy Scola is a Washington, D.C.-based writer and senior technology reporter at POLITICO who studies, reports on, and writes about where technology, innovation, politics, public policy, and culture intersect. As a freelance writer, her work has appeared in a range of publications, including POLITICO MagazineWashingtonianReutersThe American ProspectSeedNew YorkNext City, and The Atlantic online  -- where she served as the political tech correspondent during the 2012 U.S. presidential race. She's been a reporter and editor at the Washington PostAnd from 2008 to 2011 was associate editor at techPresident, one of the first publications to examine technology's impact on politics. 

In her time in journalism, Nancy has covered topics like the origins and meaning of Uberperhaps the oddest political technology firm working today, and the battle between the U.S. and Russia over the future of the Internet.  She's always on the hunt for a good story and thinks humans are pretty interesting. She likes few things better than moderating conference panels and traveling. Her best trip yet was probably a handful of days in Havana in 2015 to cover Airbnb's introduction to Cuba. Second best, probably: a visit Pittsburgh to write on the opening of the hipster hotel Ace there. While she's most focused on technology and innovation, she has also reported farther afield, like a piece on the case immigration-reform advocates are making for local visas and another on the contested future of Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Before crossing over into journalism in 2007, Nancy spent four years in the U.S. Congress doing government oversight work. Then there was also a short stint in presidential politics. Born and raised in New Jersey (Jersey!), after a decade in Brooklyn she now lives in the District of Columbia's Capitol Hill neighborhood. She holds an undergraduate degree in anthropology and Africana studies from the George Washington University, and a master's degree in anthropology from Boston University, where she was a fellow in the university's African Studies Center. She has a little Kiswahili. But not much.